Before You Fire, Help Your New Hire

Pinnacle All, Management Best Practices 1 Comment

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If you’ve been an employer for any considerable length of time, you have probably seen your fair share of new hires who have either quit their new job right off the bat or have simply not been right for the position they were hired to fill. This type of situation is not fun for any party involved. The unfit employee is already squirming, knowing that dismissal is imminent, while you, the employer, are also feeling uncomfortable and planning how you will let the person go. How many times have you found yourself in this unpleasant situation?

Don’t Fire New Employees; Help Them Succeed

Did you know that “bad egg” employees are more fixable than you may think? Sure, there are some employees who may be lost causes. However, there are many who, with the right kind of help, could succeed in the position you hired them to fill. Are you willing to go the extra mile to ensure their success?

Is Your Employee Unmotivated?

A recent study from Leadership IQ revealed that “17 percent of new hires fail because they lack the necessary motivation to excel.” Before you assume that a lack of motivation is a new hire’s fault, ask yourself if your workplace is feeding or starving the individual’s feelings of motivation. For example, does your employee have any power to make his or her own decisions in the workplace? Does he or she have clear advancement opportunities in sight? Does the new hire feel important? The best way to find the answers to these questions is to ask your employee directly.

Do your best to correct a failing employee’s motivation level, and see if that helps get him or her up-to-par with your standards. There’s a good chance it will.

Does Your New Hire Feel Excluded at Work?

How often does your new hire work alone? Does he or she have the opportunity to get to know fellow employees? If the new employee’s position limits human interaction, that could be the reason he or she is not doing well professionally. Kazim Ladimeji, writer for recruiter.com, says, “If your new hire is socially isolated, you should try to get them involved in more collaborative projects. Doing so may help new hires feel more confident, more connected, and more motivated.”

Does Your Employee Feel Welcome at Your Organization?

The last question you should ask yourself before you let a new hire go is, “Does my employee feel welcome at my company?” Many times, employees who are failing to meet an employer’s expectations do not feel welcome in their new job. The good news is there are plenty of ways to make a new hire feel welcome at work. If you give your best effort to creating a welcoming work environment, you may notice a change in employee performance.

Don’t fire new hires. Instead, help them out by working to increase their motivation and ensuring they feel included and welcome at your organization. Taking such measures may turn problem employees into star performers.

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  1. “If your new hire is socially isolated, you should try to get them involved in more collaborative projects. Doing so may help new hires feel more confident, more connected, and more motivated.”

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